What is the best card stock to use for making scrapbook pages?

I am not real familiar with scrapbook terms, so bare with me. I noticed there are different weights of cardstock paper. Which one should I use for the backside of the background paper, so that the page is not flimsy? I purchased some Die Cuts with a View Card Stock from Joann’s, but it just does not seem thick enough. Then I thought maybe this is how thick the card stock should be I do not want it to be as stiff as board, because I still have to keep in mind this has be able to fit into a page protector. I have noticed if the pages are too stiff it is a pain in the butt to make them slide into the page protector. Can someone recommend some card stock to me and where to get it?

I’ve used DCWV cardstock myself, and it works just fine…it does seem a bit "bendy" but unless you are gluing some very heavy embellishments it holds up. But most scrapbookers will tell you that the best cardstock out there is made by Bazzill…it comes in different textures and sheens, in loads of colors. They even have cardstock with zigzag and scallop borders, and smaller pieces in shapes like flowers and hearts. Definitely a brand to try!

8 thoughts on “What is the best card stock to use for making scrapbook pages?”

  1. I’ve used DCWV cardstock myself, and it works just fine…it does seem a bit "bendy" but unless you are gluing some very heavy embellishments it holds up. But most scrapbookers will tell you that the best cardstock out there is made by Bazzill…it comes in different textures and sheens, in loads of colors. They even have cardstock with zigzag and scallop borders, and smaller pieces in shapes like flowers and hearts. Definitely a brand to try!
    References :
    http://www.bazzillbasics.com

  2. If you are going to be gluing buttons and heavier items onto your page you will want a heavier cardstock. I recommend using Stampin Up! Cardstock. It is definitely the best out there if you want nice thick cardstock. And they sell it in 12×12!
    But if you aren’t sticking anything but pictures and diecuts, stickers, then you won’t need anything too sturdy. The basic cheap cardstock will work fine. I have used just regular patterned paper and stuck everything on it and its worked.
    References :

  3. Most cardstocks out there are made by just a few manufacturers so don’t bother to get hooked by a name brand. Generally, cardstock with a texture will be thicker than cardstock that is "flat" so perhaps that would work better for you.
    I prefer textured cs and don’t have a problem with getting it into a typical page protector. Sometimes when that’s happening, it’s because there are too many embellishments on a page. At last resort, you can always shave a tiny sliver off on one side before you start your layout.
    References :

  4. The 2 most common weights are 80# and 65#. Both are considered cardstock and not paper. The 80# is a heavy weight and works well as a single page background- it’s stiffer, but still flexible. The 65# is a medium weight and works best as a layering cardstock. If you plan to do matting or lots of layered cutouts glued or taped on your background, then you want to use the 65#- otherwise, as you mentioned above, the pages get really stiff and they just get too thick. But, for the simple scrapper, the 80# works fine, especially if your main embellishment is a stamped image or stickers or just a thin paper mat around a picture.

    As for where to find it- any walmart will have both choices, as will JoAnn’s, hobby lobby, michael’s, etc. or check out http://www.amandaallison.ismyangel.net, go to products and then cardstock/paper and you’ll get a list of fun choices. All the cardstocks on the site are 80# unless otherwise noted. You can also check out the "in the studio" link or the "creative corner" for some great ideas and other tips. Good luck!
    References :
    the angel company

  5. The weight is key, as well as the texture. There are also neat tools that let you texture with different backgrounds your regular cardstock or Dry emboss it (Fiskars Shapeboss and texture plates)

    I love the choice of colors that Close To My Heart has and they coordinate easily. If you have a good, sturdy page protector it should not matter what weight of paper you use, just be careful as you place it inside, once in pages are normally there just for viewing so don’t stress.
    References :

  6. I love anything by Bazzill papers. They are heavy duty and work great. I used to be able to buy it at my local Joanns, but they don’t have it anymore. Any scrapbook store should have it though. Also, if you go to a scrapbook store they have their cardstock displayed as individual sheets not as packs. That way you can feel some different ones and see what feels like what you had in mind.
    References :

  7. As long as it’s acid/lignin free you’re good to go. Die Cuts with a View is fine. Like other’s said Bazzill is great…or companies that print at the same paper mill as Bazzill (there are quite a few, including some direct sales companies). Also Prism cardstock is good as well.

    Unless you’re specifically using the cardstock to make something heavier like an explosion box, the DCWV is fine, as it’s acid/lignin free and will be protected in your album by your page protector.
    References :

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